Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Privileged Electrophile Sensors: A Resource for Covalent Drug Development

Marcus John Curtis Long, Yimon Aye

Cell Chemical Biology

10.1016/j.chembiol.2017.05.023

This Perspective delineates how redox signaling affects the activity of specific enzyme isoforms and how this property may be harnessed for rational drug design. Covalent drugs have resurged in recent years and several reports have extolled the general virtues of developing irreversible inhibitors. Indeed, many modern pharmaceuticals contain electrophilic appendages. Several invoke a warhead that hijacks active-site nucleophiles whereas others take advantage of spectator nucleophilic side chains that do not participate in enzymatic chemistry, but are poised to bind/react with electrophiles. The latest data suggest that innate electrophile sensing—which enables rapid reaction with an endogenous signaling electrophile—is a quintessential resource for the development of covalent drugs. For instance, based on recent work documenting isoform-specific electrophile sensing, isozyme non-specific drugs may be converted to isozyme-specific analogs by hijacking privileged first-responder electrophile-sensing cysteines. Because this approach targets functionally relevant cysteines, we can simultaneously harness previously untapped moonlighting roles of enzymes linked to redox sensing

Discovery and Characterization of a Novel Series of Chloropyrimidines as Covalent Inhibitors of the Kinase MSK1

Adrian Hall, Jan Abendroth, Madison J. Bolejack, Tom Ceska, Sylvie Dell’Aiera, Victoria Ellis, David Fox, Cyril François, Muigai M. Muruthi,...